Thoughts of the Week Page 6
(Back to Shultz Home Page)    (Back to Sermons Home Page)

< Back

Next >

"There are two kinds of people, those who do the work and those who take the credit. Try to be in the first group; there is less competition there."

--Indira Gandhi (1)

1. Pastor Tim [posts@cybersaltlists.org]

###    (Back)     (Top)     (Back to Shultz Home Page)    (Back to Sermons Home Page)    (Next)

"Perseverance is not a long race; it is many short races one after another." (Walter Elliott) (1)

1. preachingnow@preaching.com

###    (Back)     (Top)     (Back to Shultz Home Page)    (Back to Sermons Home Page)    (Next)

"Peace is not merely a distant goal that we seek, but a means by which we arrive at that goal." --Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (1)

1. Pastor Tim [posts@cybersaltlists.org]

###    (Back)     (Top)     (Back to Shultz Home Page)    (Back to Sermons Home Page)    (Next)

"Trust the past to the mercy of God, the present to his love, and the future to his providence." --St. Augustine

###    (Back)     (Top)     (Back to Shultz Home Page)    (Back to Sermons Home Page)    (Next)

"The reason you are stronger when you are younger is that you need to be. Mostly because you are more stupid." --Henry Miller(1)

1. Thanks to Sue Miholer for today's CleanQuote. Pastor Tim [posts@cybersaltlists.org]

###    (Back)     (Top)     (Back to Shultz Home Page)    (Back to Sermons Home Page)    (Next)

"It's so simple to be wise. Just think of something stupid to say and then don't say it." -Sam Levenson (1)

1. Thanks to Lee Quinn for today's CleanQuote. Pastor Tim [posts@cybersaltlists.org]

###    (Back)     (Top)     (Back to Shultz Home Page)    (Back to Sermons Home Page)    (Next)

"Going to church doesn't make you any more a Christian than standing in the garage makes you a car." (1)

1. Billy Graham, http://www.billygraham.org, Pastor Tim [posts@cybersaltlists.org]

###    (Back)     (Top)     (Back to Shultz Home Page)    (Back to Sermons Home Page)    (Next)

One day at a time

A tourist once visited a cathedral where an artist was working on a huge mosaic.

A vast empty wall was before the artist, and the tourist asked, “Aren’t you worried about all that space that you need to fill up and how you will ever finish it?”

The artist replied simply that he knew what he could do in each day. Each morning, he marked off the area he would complete, and he didn’t allow himself to worry about what lay outside that space.

He just took one day at a time, and one day the mosaic would be finished.

Many of the great obstacles that stall our momentum are very much like that great wall. We can worry about the bigger picture we have to create.

Or we can simply start to fill it with wonderful, unique images—the imprint of our lives—by doing the very best we can with each day we are given.

Where do you start? I offer a simple answer: The best place to start is wherever you are today.

From Simple Steps, by Arthur Caliandro

###    (Back)     (Top)     (Back to Shultz Home Page)    (Back to Sermons Home Page)    (Next)

Helga told me of a saying that a 90 year old woman used was using to explain how she retained a sense of excitement in her life.

"If you always do what you always have done, you'll always get what you have always got."

It is necessary to take risks.

One evening I was watching Singing With the Saints, with Bill and Gloria Gaither on TNN. One of the performers read a story. I do not remember the name of the story or the author. The names are factitious, primarily because I do not remember them. The story went like this:

Grace received an invitation to the Annual Sunday School Picnic. She taught Sunday School and could not avoid the picnic.

The Annual Sunday School Picnic would be at Salisbury School, Saturday, 4:00 p.m. Potluck supper and activities for the whole family.

Grace worked first shift at the hospital. There was no time to stop and buy food She would have to bring something to eat from what she had at home. When she got home she looked in the refrigerator. What was she going to bring? She had a piece of bologna and two slices of rather stale bread. There was enough mustard to get it on your knuckles as you scoop it out of the jar.

Grace wrapped her sandwich in brown paper and went to the picnic. She was sitting by herself at a table when the Small family joined her.

The Small's were a large family with several baskets of food. They begin to unpack what they had brought, fried chicken, fresh homemade potato salad, baked beans, fresh baked rolls, olives and pickles.

Grace's mouth began to water as she looked at what the Small's had brought and her own unappetizing bologna sandwich. She wished she could share.

Mrs. Small looks over and said to Grace, "Let's share." Grace resisted her suggestion.

Mrs. Small insisted, "We can share what we have." Embarrassed, Grace tried to explain that all she had was a bologna sandwich. "That's all right dear," replied Mrs. Small, "We'll share. Grace reluctantly agreed, and they did share.

Do you want a stale bologna sandwich or ?

###    (Back)     (Top)     (Back to Shultz Home Page)    (Back to Sermons Home Page)    (Next)

Four R's for the Spirit (1)

Remembering. Take time to reflect on your life and its events. What were your accomplishments? What must be left undone? ...

Reassessing. Take time to see your life as a whole. You may ask what your life really added up to, or who you really were. You might share your thoughts with those who know and love you...

Reconciling. Try to be at peace with yourself...Reconciliation with your imperfections and those of others can help you find peace.

Reuniting. Try to be at peace with those you love...As serious illness threatens, it is important to come together with family and friends, when you can, and to have the chance to say farewells.

1. Joanne Lynn and Joan Harrold, Handbook for Mortals (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999), 30. Quoted in Homiletics, March 25 , 2001, Rebreathing Lessons. Used with permission.

###    (Back)     (Top)     (Back to Shultz Home Page)    (Back to Sermons Home Page)    (Next)

From the Internet: Two Brothers and a Creek

Once upon a time brothers who lived on adjoining farms fell into conflict It was the first serious rift in 40 years of farming side by side, sharing machinery, and trading labor and goods as needed without hitch. It began with a small misunderstanding, it grew into a major difference, and finally it exploded into an exchange of bitter words followed by weeks of silence.

One morning there was a knock on Johns door. He opened it to find a man with a carpenters toolbox. "Im looking for a few days work," he said. "Perhaps you would have a few small jobs here and there. Could I help you?"

"Yes" said the older brother. "I do have a job for you. Look across the creek at that farm. That' my neighbor. In fact, it' my younger brother. Last week there was a meadow between us. He took his bulldozer to the river levee and now there is a creek between us.

"Well, he may have done this to spite me, but Ill go him one better. See that pile of lumber curing by the barn? I want you to build me a fence--an 8-foot fence so I won' need to see his place anymore. Cool him down, anyhow."

The carpenter said, "I think I understand the situation. Show me the nails and the post-hole digger and Ill be able to do a job that pleases you.

The older brother had to go to town for supplies, so he helped the carpenter get the materials ready and then he was off for the day. The carpenter worked hard all that day measuring, sawing, nailing.

About sunset when the farmer returned, the carpenter had just finished his job. The farmers eyes opened wide, and his jaw dropped. The carpenter had not built a fence, he had built a bridge--a bridge stretching from one side of the creek to the other! A fine piece of work, handrails and all and the neighbor, the farmers younger brother, was coming across, his hand outstretched.

"You are quite a fellow to build this bridge after all I've said and done."

The two brothers met in the middle, taking each others hand. They turned to see the carpenter hoist his toolbox on his shoulder.

"No, wait! Stay a few days. I've a lot of other projects for you," said the older brother.

"Id love to stay on," the carpenter said but I have many more bridges to build."

This says it all!

###    (Back)     (Top)     (Back to Shultz Home Page)    (Back to Sermons Home Page)    (Next)

"Learning usually passes through three stages. In the beginning you learn the right answers. In the second stage you learn the right questions. In the third and final stage you learn which questions are worth asking," -Bits & Pieces, April 2, 1992. (1)

1. Quoted in Homiletics, April 1, 2001, Carbeque Christians. Used with permission.

###    (Back)     (Top)     (Back to Shultz Home Page)    (Back to Sermons Home Page)    (Next)

Dr. David Kundtz in his book Stopping writes: "Only when I can acknowledge all parts of me, can I move from childhood to maturity, from isolation to community, and from running and cowering to peace and equanimity."

To illustrate his point he is reminded of an opening to an old radio program, The Shadow, and he quotes both Alexander Solzhenitszn and M. Scott Peck.

"When I was a boy, my brother and I would listen to The Shadow on the radio. The part of the program that I remember vividly is the beginning with the scary music and a man’s deep, sinister voice asking, 'What evil lurks in the hearts of men? The Shadow knows!' The voice would trail off in menacing and foreboding laughter. It scared us. It still scares people.

"What indeed does my Shadow know? Do I also know it? Will it surprise and scare me? What if I can’t handle it? That’s where courage comes in.

"Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Russian dissident and novelist, said,

'If only there were evil people somewhere insidiously committing evil deeds, and it were necessary only to separate them from the rest of us and destroy them. But the line dividing good and evil cuts through the heart of every human being.'

"That includes mine and yours. If we could have the courage to embrace our scary shadows, we would thereby take a giant leap to heal our deep and lasting pain....

"M. Scott Peck, speaking of evil in The Road Less Traveled and Beyond, says, the,

'central defect of evil is not the sin but the refusal to acknowledge it.' The refusal to acknowledge our dark tendencies is the central defect, not the dark tendencies.

"As Solzhenitsyn said, those tendencies are always with us; both good and evil are in all our hearts."

"Only when I can acknowledge all parts of me, can I move from childhood to maturity, from isolation to community, and from running and cowering to peace and equanimity."

--Dr. David Kundtz, Stopping (Berkeley: Conari Press, 1998), 156. Quoted in Homiletics, Carbeque Christians April 1, 2001 (Used with permission)
 

< Back

Next >

(Top)     (Back to Shultz Home Page)    (Back to Sermons Home Page)